Future
Titles


Spring 2019


Animal Noses

Animal Noses
Written by Mary Holland

Noses come in all kinds of shapes and sizes that are just right for its particular animal host. Not only do most animals use their noses to breathe but for many animals, the sense of smell helps them find food, a mate, or even to know when danger is near! Following Animal Tails, Animal Eyes, Animal Mouths (NSTA/CBC Outstanding Trade Science Award), and Animal Legs, Mary Holland continues her photographic Animal Anatomy and Adaptations series by exploring many different animal noses and how those noses help the animals survive in their habitats.

If the Mummy Could Talk ...

If the Mummy Could Talk ...
Written by Rhonda Lucas Donald
Illustrated by Cathy Morrison

If a mummy could talk, what would it say? Of course, mummies can't talk. But with modern scientific tools, we can still discover what a mummy has to tell us. Read the stories of mummified Egyptian pharaohs and priestesses, baby elephants, pampered pets, and even a prehistoric bison. Uncover clues to centuries-old murder mysteries and human sacrifices, and even find out what a person or animal had for their last meal! Information from real scientists explains how we know what we know about each mummy. So, what do these mummies have to say? Lots, it turns out!

Long and Short Tail of Colo and Ruff, The

Long and Short Tail of Colo and Ruff, The
Written by Diane Lang
Illustrated by Laurie Allen Klein

Colo the cougar and her friend Ruff, the bobcat, jump and play together, but Ruff can't jump as far as Colo. Ruff doesn't have a long, swishy tail like Colo does, to provide balance on long leaps. Ruff's tail is much shorter. He is sure that something is wrong with him. Sympathetic, Colo suggests they find a tail that Ruff would like better, so off they go. As the two kittens explore the variety of tails worn by other animals, they make the best discovery of all.

River Rescue

River Rescue
Written by Jennifer Keats Curtis
and Tri-State Bird Rescue & Research, Inc.
Illustrated by Tammy Yee

When oil spills, workers hurry to clean the land and water. But oil spills can also affect every animal that lives in the area. Who helps these wild animals? On the East Coast, a team from Tri-State Bird Rescue & Research rushes to the scene to save as many as possible. Follow along to learn how these experts capture oiled animals and treat them quickly and safely so that they may be returned to the wild. This illustrated nonfiction is based on the extensive experience of the Oiled Wildlife Response Team at Tri-State.


Fall 2019


Animal Skins

Animal Skins
Written by Mary Holland

Fur, feathers and scales are all animal coverings or skins. Animals use their skin to stay warm and dry, protect themselves or hide or even to warn other animals to stay away. Following Animal Noses, Animal Tails, Animal Eyes, Animal Mouths (NSTA/CBC Outstanding Trade Science Award), and Animal Legs, Mary Holland continues her photographic Animal Anatomy and Adaptations series by the many different ways that animals use and rely on their skin covering adaptations to survive in their habitats.

The Forest in the Trees

The Forest in the Trees
Written by Connie McLennan

It’s common knowledge that coast redwoods are tall, tall trees. In fact, they are the tallest trees in the world. What most people don’t know is that there is a whole other forest growing high in the canopy of a redwood forest. This adaptation of The House That Jack Built climbs into this secret, hidden habitat full of all kinds of plants and animals that call this forest home.